Remaining responsive in the pursuit of excellence

  Plomp , Louise Zhang // What artful, fun and interesting combinations can we create when we look at creative practice as space without 'boxes'? 

Plomp, Louise Zhang // What artful, fun and interesting combinations can we create when we look at creative practice as space without 'boxes'? 

A friend wisely said to me that the answer we have to creative education today is “one of many possible answers” that could have rooted itself in our society. In times of great change and uncertainty, do the things that we perceive to be ‘right’ hold as much integrity as they used to? Perhaps loosening the attachment to established methodology in achieving a particular goal or vision can free us of the tension created between what we instinctively feel we would like to do and was present times suggest would we wise, versus systems that have grounded themselves as the status quo over the centuries. Micro movements in education and discussion within the design community would suggest that in the future a mind that is able to integrate different subject matter could be helpful. Renowned trend forecaster Li Edelkoort is introducing a department of Hybrid Design Studies to the Parson’s School of Design, New York claiming that the present system “seems to be obsolete” which builds on a conversation with Thomas Heatherwick who mentioned that he believes there is no difference in the process of designing a building as there is to a chair. “Whether something is a Christmas card or a masterplan for a site that's eight miles long, we've found it's exactly the same process that you're going through,” Heatherwick said to Dezeen. Perhaps then whether we choose to take the responsibility of being entirely self educated or are within an institution at a specialised course and eye on our future and the future would be wise.

Words by Natasha J. Hussein